Escallonia Macrantha

This reliable and highly decorative flowering shrub has made its way to Europe and the UK from South America and has proved itself to be a popular and successful informal hedging plant. With its glossy green leaves and a floral display that lasts from summer through autumn, it asks for little but gives a great deal in return…

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Single Row

Length of your hedge (m) We recommend 0 plants for this length and when planting; our recommendation is to space each plant 45 centimetres apart.

Hedge Xpress Escallonia Macrantha

Escallonia Macrantha at-a-glance

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Foliage Type: Evergreen 

Flowers: Dark Red in summer and autumn

Hardiness: ✯✯✯

Ease of maintenance: ✯✯✯✯✯

Drought Resistance: ✯✯✯✯

Growth Rate: Vigorous 

Soil type: Any

Wet/Dry: Moist but well-drained soil

Preferred situation: Sheltered partial shade or full sun

Height / Spread: 4m / 4m

Soil and Situation: Escallonia Macrantha (Rubra) is not fussy at all. It will thrive in any soil type (including chalk and clay) that is both moist and well-drained. Happy in sun or partial shade, it has a slight preference for a sheltered spot but this is not essential. It also grows well in coastal areas.

Maintenance: An annual trim in late autumn to keep its shape is all that’s really required. Given that Escallonia Macrantha (Rubra) is one of the fastest growing hedging plants, it’s best not to neglect this simple task.

Versatility: Escallonia Macrantha (Rubra) is not just a pretty face. Striking enough to make a specimen plant to be proud of, its dense growth offers excellent privacy should you require your hedge to double up as a screen.

And finally: Virginia Woolf’s 1922 novel, Jacob’s Room (a character study of its eponymous hero), gives a rare, if brief, literary mention to the Escallonia: “Behind them, again, was the grey-green garden, and among the pear-shaped leaves of the escallonia fishing-boats seemed caught and suspended…”